Patient FAQs

How long is the typical first visit?

You can expect your first visit to take about two hours.

I am very anxious about dental care. What can you do to help me?

The center offers appropriate relief available for just about every situation and every level of anxiety. Dr. Datar is licensed by the State of Colorado to provide intravenous conscious sedation.

Does a periodontal exam hurt?

The periodontal exam can usually be completed with little or no discomfort. Taking time and being gentle goes a long way to making you comfortable.

What should I do if I am embarrassed about the state of my mouth?

Everyone in our center is very sensitive to how many patients feel about the health status of their teeth. You can be assured that neither the doctors nor the team will shame you. It is our intent to help you become healthy, not to pass judgment.

Do I need x-rays?

If your referring dentist has taken x-rays, you may request that they be forwarded to the center. We sometimes need to take x-rays, and that happens right here at the center during your initial visit. We also offer cone beam CT imaging on site, which saves you a visit to another location. Cone beam CT is usually needed for dental implant planning, but is also used to diagnose periodontal, endodontic, and other oral conditions.

What will my treatment cost?

The center’s philosophy is to treat as conservatively as possible to attain your treatment goals. An approximate fee can be determined at the initial visit or shortly thereafter.

Do you take my insurance?

We accept payment options through CareCredit® and Lending Club.

While we do not directly work with your dental benefits carrier, we are happy to submit your claim. The carrier will send any benefit payments directly to you. We will do everything we can to help you obtain the best coverage available under your plan.

Will I need surgery?

Not everyone needs periodontal surgery. If treated early, gum disease can be controlled without surgery. As with any health problem, the sooner an issue is addressed, the less treatment is needed.

Can my teeth be saved?

Recent advances in treatment have allowed for the successful treatment of many periodontal cases. Determining a prognosis for each patient and each tooth is part of the assessment and treatment plan discussion.

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